Zoekresultaat: 6 artikelen

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Article

Access_open Giving Children a Voice in Court?

Age Boundaries for Involvement of Children in Civil Proceedings and the Relevance of Neuropsychological Insights

Tijdschrift Erasmus Law Review, Aflevering 1 2020
Trefwoorden age boundaries, right to be heard, child’s autonomy, civil proceedings, neuropsychology
Auteurs Mariëlle Bruning en Jiska Peper
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    In the last decade neuropsychological insights have gained influence with regard to age boundaries in legal procedures, however, in Dutch civil law no such influence can be distinguished. Recently, voices have been raised to improve children’s legal position in civil law: to reflect upon the minimum age limit of twelve years for children to be invited to be heard in court and the need for children to have a stronger procedural position.
    In this article, first the current legal position of children in Dutch law and practice will be analysed. Second, development of psychological constructs relevant for family law will be discussed in relation to underlying brain developmental processes and contextual effects. These constructs encompass cognitive capacity, autonomy, stress responsiveness and (peer) pressure.
    From the first part it becomes clear that in Dutch family law, there is a tortuous jungle of age limits, exceptions and limitations regarding children’s procedural rights. Until recently, the Dutch government has been reluctant to improve the child’s procedural position in family law. Over the last two years, however, there has been an inclination towards further reflecting on improvements to the child’s procedural rights, which, from a children’s rights perspective, is an important step forward. Relevant neuropsychological insights support improvements for a better realisation of the child’s right to be heard, such as hearing children younger than twelve years of age in civil court proceedings.


Mariëlle Bruning
Mariëlle Bruning is Professor of Child Law at Leiden Law Faculty, Leiden University.

Jiska Peper
Jiska Peper is Assistant professor in the Developmental and Educational Psychology unit of the Institute of Psychology at Leiden University.
Article

Access_open Juveniles’ Right to Counsel during Police Interrogations: An Interdisciplinary Analysis of a Youth-Specific Approach, with a Particular Focus on the Netherlands

Tijdschrift Erasmus Law Review, Aflevering 4 2014
Trefwoorden legal representation, counsel, juvenile justice, police interrogations, children’s rights
Auteurs Prof. Dr. Ton Liefaard Ph.D. LL.M en Yannick van den Brink
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The right to counsel of juveniles at the stage of police interrogations has gained significant attention since the Salduz ruling of the European Court on Human Rights in 2008. The legislative and policy developments that have taken place since then and that are still ongoing – both on a regional (European) and domestic (Dutch) level – reveal a shared belief that juvenile suspects must be awarded special protection in this phase of the criminal justice proceedings. This calls for a youth-specific approach as fundamentally different from the common approach for adults. At the same time, there seems to be ambivalence concerning the justification and concrete implications of such a youth-specific approach. This article aims to clarify the underlying rationale and significance of a youth specific approach to the right to counsel at the stage of police interrogations on the basis of an interdisciplinary analysis of European Court on Human Rights case law, international children’s rights standards and relevant developmental psychological insights. In addition, this article aims to position this right of juveniles in conflict with the law in the particular context of the Dutch juvenile justice system and provide concrete recommendations to the Dutch legislator.


Prof. Dr. Ton Liefaard Ph.D. LL.M
Prof. Dr. T. Liefaard is Professor of Children’s Rights (UNICEF Chair) at Leiden Law School, Department of Child Law; t.liefaard@law.leidenuniv.nl.

Yannick van den Brink
Y.N. van den Brink, LL.M, MA, is PhD researcher at Leiden Law School, Department of Child Law; y.n.van.den.brink@law.leidenuniv.nl.
Artikel

Strafrechtelijke verantwoordelijkheid en de neurowetenschappen

Tijdschrift Justitiële verkenningen, Aflevering 1 2013
Trefwoorden neuroscience, legal responsibility, mental capacities, brain mechanisms, brain imaging techniques
Auteurs N. Vincent
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This paper argues that to the extent that legal responsibility hinges on mental capacities – capacities which are implemented in (brain) mechanisms – scientists working in the fields of behavioural genetics and neuroscience can assist courts to adjudicate responsibility in several ways. First, by studying what mechanisms paradigmatically fully responsible agents possess and how those mechanisms operate. Second, by developing techniques to more individually, accurately and less subjectively inspect people’s mechanisms to gauge their true mental capacities. Third, by studying how youth, advanced age, and mental disorders affect these mechanisms. And fourth, by developing interventions to create, restore and enhance the function of these mechanisms in order to create, restore and enhance people’s responsibility-relevant mental capacities.


N. Vincent
Prof. Nicole Vincent is verbonden aan de Macquarie University in Sidney en aan de Technische Universiteit Delft.
Artikel

Data en interpretaties in de cognitieve neurowetenschap

Tijdschrift Justitiële verkenningen, Aflevering 1 2013
Trefwoorden cognitive neuroscience, criminal law, single cell recording, functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, interpretation of neuroscientific data
Auteurs W.F.G. Haselager, F. Leoné en D.A.G. van Toor
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Research in cognitive neuroscience may have significant implications for law. In order to assess such implications properly, a basic knowledge of the complexities involved in the acquisition and interpretation of brain data could be helpful. In this paper the authors will discuss some of the issues involved in two basic techniques of cognitive neuroscience: single cell recordings and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The authors aim to improve the reader’s understanding of the kind of assumptions and inferences that help to bridge the gap between data and interpretation.


W.F.G. Haselager
Dr. Pim Haselager is als associate professor verbonden aan het Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour van de Radboud Universiteit.

F. Leoné
Frank Leoné, MSc is promovendus bij het Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour van de Radboud Universiteit.

D.A.G. van Toor
Dave van Toor, LLM, BSc is als junior docent/promovendus verbonden aan de Faculteit der Rechtsgeleerdheid van de Radboud Universiteit.

Hjalmar van Marle
Hjalmar van Marle is Professor of forensic psychiatry at the Erasmus University Medical Centre and at the School of Law of Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
Article

Access_open Introduction

Multi- and interdisciplinarity: mere theory or just practice?

Tijdschrift Erasmus Law Review, Aflevering 3 2008
Auteurs Jeanne Gaakeer

Jeanne Gaakeer
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