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Artikel

Is herstelrecht voor jeugdigen volwassen geworden?

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 4 2020
Trefwoorden jeugdstrafrecht, jeugdherstelrecht, binding, kinderrechten, herstelrechtelijk jeugdsanctierecht
Auteurs Annemieke Wolthuis
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The 20th anniversary of this journal is a good reason to glance back at developments with restorative justice for children and young people. Can we say that restorative youth justice has become mature? Some core events and articles about developments in Belgium, the Netherlands and elsewhere are discussed, paying attention to young suspects as well as victims. Subsequently, the embedding of restorative justice in youth laws is discussed. Finally, the article focuses on the question what should be done to improve the implementation into an effective, child friendly and ‘rights based’ youth sanction model.


Annemieke Wolthuis
Annemieke Wolthuis is kinderrechter-plaatsvervanger bij de Rechtbank Rotterdam, mediator en vicevoorzitter van het European Forum for Restorative Justice.
Artikel

Welke samenleving in het herstelrecht?

Uitdagingen voor burgerschap en samenlevingsopbouw

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 4 2020
Trefwoorden burgerschap, samenlevingsopbouw, samenleving als actor, Vreedzame Wijk, Eigen Kracht-conferentie
Auteurs Ivo Aertsen
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This article discusses the concepts of society and community involvement as they appeared in the articles of the Dutch-Flemish Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht (Journal of Restorative Justice) during last 20 years. It shows how the journal from its very beginning adopted a strong focus on criminal justice reform, although restorative practices within the community occupied a considerable space in the consecutive volumes as well. Studies on restorative justice programmes in Belgium and The Netherlands, such as victim-offender mediation and family-group conferences, revealed a predominant orientation on interpersonal relationships stressing the role of the community of care. In the same sense, also community mediation and other community oriented restorative practices focus on the personal well-being of people and the improvement of personal and social relationships. Hence, both theory and practice face two important challenges in developing restorative justice: (1) which role to give to a larger community and how to operationalize its involvement, and (2) how to deal with underlying causes of crime and social-structural injustices? Referring to European action-research projects and to conceptual models developed outside Europe, a case is made for designing restorative justice methodologies and programmes involving civil society in a more encompassing way and linking micro to macro societal levels. Developing strategic alliances with new social movements could be the way forward.


Ivo Aertsen
Ivo Aertsen is redacteur van dit tijdschrift en hoofdredacteur van The International Journal on Restorative Justice.
Artikel

Naar een regierecht voor de burger in het sociale domein?

Het recht op een familiegroepsplan als legal transplant

Tijdschrift Recht der Werkelijkheid, Aflevering 2 2017
Trefwoorden Family group conference, Legal transplant, Care professionals, Family life, Big Society
Auteurs Dr. Annie de Roo en Dr. Rob Jagtenberg
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The concept of family group conferences (FGCs) originated in New Zealand in 1989 as a tool and statutory right for extended family networks to arrange for the welfare and safety of a child that is neglected or abused by his/her own parents. Through successful FGCs, state intervention can be avoided while the resourcefulness of the larger community is mobilized. The concept has proliferated to many countries and therefore lends itself for analysis as a ‘legal transplant’. This contribution investigates the FGC as a transplant, focussing on how the concept has been adapted and incorporated in the legal systems of England and the Netherlands. In these two countries the ‘Big Society’ and austerity measures in the social domain are high on the policy agenda. How are such policy priorities blended – if at all – with the emancipatory ideal of granting family networks autonomy next to, or even over, publicly funded professionals? It appears that the FGC concept has been compromised in both England and the Netherlands, but in different ways.


Dr. Annie de Roo
Annie de Roo is associate professor aan de Erasmus Law School te Rotterdam.

Dr. Rob Jagtenberg
Rob Jagtenberg is senior fellow aan de Erasmus Law School te Rotterdam.

John Blad

Bas van Stokkom
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