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Artikel

Surveilleren en opsporen in een internetomgeving

Tijdschrift Justitiële verkenningen, Aflevering 5 2012
Trefwoorden Policing, Internet, open-source intelligence, iColumbo, police power
Auteurs J.J. Oerlemans en B.J. Koops
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Publicly available information on the Internet about people or criminal acts can be relevant to criminal investigations. This article analyses to what extent Dutch criminal procedure law allows open source intelligence for law-enforcement purposes. When more than ‘minor’ privacy interferences arise, an explicit investigatory power in the criminal procedure code is required. Minor infringements are allowed under the general task description in the Police Act 1993. It is unclear however when ‘substantial’ privacy infringements arise. On the basis of ECHR jurisprudence on foreseeability and the Dutch criteria for ‘systematic observation’, the authors conclude that Internet data-gathering will often require an explicit investigatory power and can only be used for criminal investigation with an order from the public prosecutor, but not, except for small-scale and ad hoc searches, for general police practice purposes. Because the Internet is much different in its nature from a decade ago and the investigatory powers are not in all respects easily applicable to Internet surveillance, the authors argue that the Dutch legislator must take action and make clear under which conditions information on the Internet can be gathered by law enforcement.


J.J. Oerlemans
Mr. Jan-Jaap Oerlemans is promovendus bij eLaw@Leiden, Centrum voor Recht in de Informatiemaatschappij van de Universiteit Leiden. Daarnaast is hij juridisch adviseur bij Fox-IT.

B.J. Koops
Prof. dr. Bert-Jaap Koops is hoogleraar regulering van technologie bij TILT – Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society van de Universiteit van Tilburg.

    In the past decades, telecommunications traffic has grown explosively. There has been an enormous expansion of the use of mobile phones. In addition, the way in which these phones are used has changed as well. An ever growing number of mobile phones is connected to the Internet, and a growing share of communications take place through the Internet. As a result, communication gets increasingly fragmented, because of the various ways and channels available for communication. In this article, the authors discuss the possible implications of these developments for the use of the telephone tap as an investigative tool during criminal investigations. Furthermore, the authors examine the ways in which the internet tap can support or replace the use of the telephone tap. Finally, alternative investigation tools are discussed that might compensate the changing results of the telephone tap.


G. Odinot
Dr. G. Odinot is onderzoeker bij het WODC.

D. de Jong
D. de Jong, MSc is onderzoeker bij het WODC.

    The future of wiretapping is threatened by encryption and developments in the telecommunications industry. Internet communications changed the wiretapping landscape fundamentally. In practice it is often impossible to wiretap all possible internet connections. Not all communication providers are obliged to execute wiretap orders. This limits the use of a wiretap in an increasingly digital world. Although the content of certain encrypted Voice-over-IP communications and private messages might not be visible to law enforcement officials, the traffic data are. These traffic data show when the suspect connects to certain communication services, which provide important clues to proceed in a criminal investigation. It is important to have a discussion whether our wiretap laws need to be amended to better fit the needs of law enforcement. However, to make such a debate possible we need transparency. A good first step is to provide details and statistics about the use of internet wiretaps.


J.J. Oerlemans
Mr. Jan-Jaap Oerlemans is promovendus bij eLaw@Leiden, Centrum voor Recht in de Informatiemaatschappij van de Universiteit Leiden. Daarnaast is hij juridisch adviseur bij Fox-IT.
Artikel

Cybercrime en politie

Een schets van de Nederlandse situatie anno 2012

Tijdschrift Justitiële verkenningen, Aflevering 1 2012
Auteurs W.Ph. Stol, E.R. Leukfeldt en H. Klap
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    In 2004 the main problem of the Dutch police concerning cybercrime was a lack of knowledge, for example about how to act in a digital world, about the character of cybercrime and about the effectiveness of measures. The main question in this article is if this situation has changed, and if so, how. Although the legislator has given the police special powers to fight crime in a digital world, the police still struggle with questions about what exactly are the powers they have. Although the police have invested in pilot projects and in the recruitment of digital experts, knowledge about ‘policing a digital society’ is not yet common in the police organisation - which is a shortcoming since ‘digital is normal’ in the lives of the common people. Although the police established digital aspects in police training, digital is not yet a common feature in police education. In sum, although the police in various ways pay attention to digital aspects of policing, digital is not yet a regular part of the police organisation, police training and/or everyday police practice.


W.Ph. Stol
Prof. dr. Wouter Stol is lector Cybersafety aan NHL Hogeschool en de Politieacademie en bijzonder hoogleraar Politiestudies aan de Open Universiteit.

E.R. Leukfeldt
E.R. Leukfeldt Msc is onderzoeker bij het lectoraat Cybersafety van NHL Hogeschool en Politieacademie.

H. Klap
Drs. Henk Klap MPM is programmamanager van het landelijke politiële Programma Aanpak Cybercrime (PAC).
Artikel

Slachtofferschap van identiteitsfraude

Een studie naar aard, omvang, risicofactoren en nasleep

Tijdschrift Justitiële verkenningen, Aflevering 1 2012
Auteurs J. van Wilsem
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Identity fraud involves the theft of another person's identity information (e.g. bank account number and password), mostly for purposes of financial gain to the offender. The literature review summarizes main results from international and Dutch research with respect to the nature, size, risk factors and aftermath of identity fraud as well as the consequences for its victims. Though scientific research on these phenomena is taking place more and more, much work yet remains to be done. This review ends with suggestions for future research on identity fraud.


J. van Wilsem
Dr. Johan van Wilsem is als universitair hoofddocent Criminologie verbonden aan de Universiteit Leiden.

    The introduction and fast growing popularity of electronic dance music has strongly influenced the spread of so-called party drugs in Amsterdam. Trends in substances use in Amsterdam's nightlife have been monitored systematically with ‘Antenna’, combining qualitative and quantitative methods. Ecstasy remained the most popular stimulant drug, but since the late 1990s it had to compete with cocaine, and to a lesser extent with amphetamine. In the past decade, GHB and ketamine also gained popularity among clubbers and pub-goers. However, the vast majority does not take illicit drugs while going out at night. Alcohol remains by far the most popular substance, and has become even more important in the past decade.


T. Nabben
Dr. Ton Nabben is als onderzoeker verbonden aan het Bonger Instituut voor Criminologie van de Universiteit van Amsterdam.

D.J. Korf
Prof. dr. Dirk Korf is bijzonder hoogleraar criminologie en directeur van het Bonger Instituut voor Criminologie van de Universiteit van Amsterdam.
Artikel

Onder de mensen

De aanpak van transportcriminaliteit door politie, verzekeraars en schade-experts

Tijdschrift Justitiële verkenningen, Aflevering 1 2009
Auteurs M.B. Schuilenburg, A. Coenraads en P. Van Calster
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This article discusses what is left aside in the perspective of nodal governance: namely the adaptability and dynamics of social reality itself. The challenge is to research ‘what actually happens’ without reducing it to collective structures or specific frameworks in advance. Previous to specific structures (‘teams’) and frameworks (‘meetings’, ‘contracts’) there is constant change, movement and difference. By using the work of the French sociologist Gabriel Tarde (1843-1904) the authors research how the nodes police, insurers and loss adjusters cooperate in the fight against transport criminality and how interactions between these nodes take content and shape. Consequently, their cooperation is not interpreted as a static theme, but rather as a dynamic process that requires constant interpretation in terms of relationships, unexpected events, adaptations and coincidences. On the basis of fifteen in-depth interviews the authors show in which way a ‘new language’ with ‘new mechanisms’ originates within the cooperation. As a consequence, ‘informal contacts’, ‘goals and interests’, ‘mutual confidence’ and ‘information-exchange’, which play an important role between the nodes, are constantly re-defined.


M.B. Schuilenburg
Mr. drs. Marc Schuilenburg doceert aan de vakgroep Criminologie van de Vrije Universiteit te Amsterdam.

A. Coenraads
Annerieke Coenraads MSc studeerde criminologie aan de Vrije Universiteit te Amsterdam. Ze heeft op persoonlijke titel meegeschreven aan deze bijdrage.

P. Van Calster
Dr. Patrick Van Calster is als universitair hoofddocent verbonden aan het departement Strafrecht en Criminologie van de Universiteit Leiden.
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