Zoekresultaat: 49 artikelen

x
De zoekresultaten worden gefilterd op:
Jaar 2009 x Rubriek Artikel x
Artikel

Aantallen civiele rechtszaken in Nederland en elders

Een vergelijking in de tijd en in Europa

Tijdschrift Justitiële verkenningen, Aflevering 4 2009
Auteurs E. Niemeijer en C.M. Klein Haarhuis
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Academic perceptions of litigation rates are dispersed: they vary from observations of a ‘litigation explosion’ to empirical accounts of ‘vanishing trials’. In this article the authors study whether civil trials are increasing or vanishing in the Netherlands. To find out, the authors studied trends in the number of civil cases in the Dutch courts. First, they observed developments in the filings as well as the dispositions of civil cases over the past 25 years, taking into account the trial-likeness of the procedures. Second, they put the Dutch figures - including other indicators of legal activity - in a European perspective. The findings show that the number of court cases in the Netherlands is on the rise. This does not automatically imply, however, that the Netherlands are a highly litigious society. ‘Light’ versions of trials are predominant, as is efficiency in the management of cases. Moreover, the number of lawyers and judges is rather small compared to other European countries.


E. Niemeijer
Prof. dr. mr. Bert Niemeijer is werkzaam bij de directie Algemene Justitiële Strategie van het ministerie van Justitie en is tevens als hoogleraar empirische rechtssociologie verbonden aan de Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam.

C.M. Klein Haarhuis
Dr. Carolien Klein Haarhuis is als onderzoeker verbonden aan het WODC.
Artikel

Rookverboden

Surfen op golven van een veranderende maatschappelijke norm

Tijdschrift Recht der Werkelijkheid, Aflevering 01 2009
Auteurs Heleen Weyers
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Like surfers, legislators … who wish to change everyday social norms must wait for signs of a rising cultural support, catching it at just the right time... (Kagan and Skolnick 1993: 85) The empirical study of the relation between the way a law comes into being and its effectiveness in practice is an underdeveloped subject in the sociology of law. In this article this relation is studied with respect to smoking bans in the Netherlands. The focus is on private companies in general, with special attention for Dutch cafés, bars, hotels and restaurants (where such a ban was recently introduced). Dutch smoking bans in private establishments were only enacted after the government was convinced of public support and after a period of selfregulation. This proved to be a good preparation. The general picture of the relation between the emergence and the effectiveness of smoking bans in Dutch hotels, restaurants etc. is much the same. However, there is one sector - bars, pubs and the like – in which the smoking ban has encountered problems. In this sector a fourth of the establishments refuse to comply. A question addressed in this article is whether the legislator acted too precipitously with respect to this sector. This is obviously the case: there is less public support for smoking bans in such establishments and there had not been a preparatory period of selfregulation.


Heleen Weyers
Heleen Weyers is universitair docent bij de vakgroep Rechtstheorie van de faculteit Rechtsgeleerdheid van de Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. Ze promoveerde op een onderzoek naar de totstandkoming van de euthanasieregelgeving in Nederland. Sindsdien publiceert zij onderzoek waarin de verklarende kracht van veranderingen in waardes en vertrouwen voor de totstandkoming van dit type regelgeving wordt onderzocht.

J.J. Rijken

J.W. van de Gronden
Artikel

Medisch onderzoek in het kader van de asielprocedure

Enkele kanttekeningen vanuit bestuursrechtelijk en gezondheidsrechtelijk perspectief

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Gezondheidsrecht, Aflevering 8 2009
Auteurs M.L. Bosman

M.L. Bosman

E. Plomp

A. Wilken

M.C. Ploem

E.T.M. Olsthoorn-Heim

E.B. van Veen

J.C.J. Dute

M. Offerman

N. Rozemond

J.M. van der Most

J.L. Smeehuijze

J.K.M. Gevers

    How to understand the disintegration of the Dutch Caribbean? The Kingdom of the Netherlands comprising three countries - the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles, and Aruba - will be reordered. The Netherlands Antilles will cease to exist as a separate country. Curaçao and Sint Maarten will acquire country status within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, just as Aruba did in 1986, though theirs will be of a different status and with less autonomy. The islands Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba, the so-called BES islands, will be integrated into the Netherlands as public authorities (openbare lichamen); as such the BES islands will be administered by the Netherlands while retaining local government functions (just as municipalities in the Netherlands).
    This article outlines the history behind these changes and the factors that are at play. However improbable the Dutch Caribbean hypothesis, the Kingdom facilitates a connection of these islands with the international world. Against all odds and populist opponents, the Dutch Caribbean is a challenge to square the circle, a complex pact, impossible to balance, which will never come to a definitive conclusion.


L. de Jong
Dr. Lammert de Jong is bestuurskundige en was tussen 1984 en 1998 geruime tijd Vertegenwoordiger van Nederland in de Nederlandse Antillen. Hij werkt deze dagen aan een boek Being Dutch, more or less. True Dutch is not the issue, so what is? Oplevering jaarwisseling 2009/2010.

    This paper advances a ‘nodal governance’ perspective, which understands the delivery of security as being accomplished through the thinking and practices of various ‘nodes’ or entities characterized by ways of thinking about problems and influencing events. In this light, policing should be understood sociologically as involving the activities of state and non-state entities (e.g. corporations and well-resourced communities) as well as the public police. The authors argue that it is essential for police to recognize the nodal world within which they live and to locate themselves within ‘nodal assemblages’ for the delivery of security. As illustrations, the paper discusses two practical projects devoted to exploring nodal security governance arrangements in the country contexts of South Africa and Australia. The authors add that the question of what precisely nodal policing can or should look like in concrete terms is an empirical matter to be resolved within site-specific contexts.


J. Wood
Prof. Jennifer Wood is als hoogleraar verbonden aan het Department of Criminal Justice van de Australische Temple University.

C.D. Shearing
Prof. Clifford Shearing is hoogleraar bij het Centre of Criminology van de University of Cape Town, Zuid-Afrika.

    This article focuses on the question whether the nodal governance perspective is a useful and insightful instrument to analyse the growing involvement and responsibilities of a multitude of public and private actors in creating public safety and security. Subsequently the author applies the basics of nodal governance to experiences with local security networks in the Netherlands. His conclusion is that the nodal governance perspective has a number of shortcomings. One of these is an underestimation of the crucial role of the police in local security networks. Also, important obstacles to civilian participation in security networks are overlooked. Moreover, the nodal governance thinking doesn't deal with the problem of democratic control of private actors involved in security networks and the absence of guarantees that they will pursue security not only for themselves but for the community as a whole.


J. Terpstra
Dr. Jan Terpstra is verbonden aan het Criminologisch Instituut van de Radboud Universiteit in Nijmegen.

    In the past few years, an increasing number of Private Security Companies (PSCs) - also sometimes referred to as Private Military Companies (PMCs) - have emerged offering and conducting anti-piracy services. These companies offer services in addition to security provided by states and their government agencies. PSCs are today hired to provide anti-piracy services in different parts of the world, but mostly in strategically important waterways where piracy is a serious security concern. This article examines the employment of PSCs in two such waterways, namely the Malacca Straits and the Gulf of Aden, and discusses the risks, challenges and benefits of privatising maritime security.


C. Liss
Carolin Liss is als onderzoeker verbonden aan het Asia Research Center van de Murdoch University in Perth, Australië.
Toont 1 - 20 van 49 gevonden teksten
« 1 3
U kunt door de volledige tekst zoeken naar alle artikelen door uw zoekterm in het zoekveld in te vullen. Als u op de knop 'Zoek' heeft geklikt komt u op de zoekresultatenpagina met filters, die u helpen om snel bij het door u gezochte artikel te komen. Er zijn op dit moment twee filters: rubriek en jaar.