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Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht x Jaar 2010 x
Artikel

Herstelrecht in Nederland: een slachtofferperspectief

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 4 2010
Trefwoorden restorative justice, paradigma, tailoring, victims
Auteurs Marc Groenhuijsen
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The author advises the protagonists of restorative justice to become less paradigmatic and more pragmatic in their approach of criminal justice and victims needs and interests. The offer of a restorative procedure is not suitable for all victims, nor for all thinkable moments after the event of a crime. Tailoring is needed to make each victim the best offer, and the utility of restorative justice is important, but limited. The author believes that much of the restorative justice literature is aiming at proving the superiority of restorative justice practices above any other type of intervention or service, and he feels that this is partly why restorative justice has not been well received in the Netherlands. A piecemeal implementation of mediation and conferencing in the sphere of criminal justice might be served by being less paradigmatic.


Marc Groenhuijsen
Marc Groenhuijsen is hoogleraar straf(proces)recht, verbonden aan de Universiteit Tilburg en Intervict.
Artikel

Het belang van ideologie

Een reactie op Marc Groenhuijsen

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 4 2010
Trefwoorden restorative justice, Paradigma, Tailoring, victims
Auteurs John Blad
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Blad responds to Groenhuijsen by showing how political decisions in the Netherlands, after successful experiments with restorative justice for juveniles and adults, were based on the belief that criminal justice would lose its punitive foundation and tenor when restorative justice practices would become integrated in the justice system. Criminal justice should not be about resolving conflicts between victims and offenders and the type of mediation, that could lead to an agreement as an important element to be considered in sentencing, was therefore rejected. In so far as restorative justice ideology took influence, it seems to have been a misconception of restorative justice as merely a new form of penal abolitionism. The fact that restorative justice does not deny the legitimacy of the provisions in the substantive criminal law and that all important restorative projects co-operate with criminal justice agencies was apparently ignored. Against the background of the dominant political culture of ‘punitive populism’ and intensified use of severe punishments it seems highly unlikely that abandoning the ambition to develop a restorative justice paradigm would further the implementation of restorative justice.


John Blad
John Blad is hoofddocent strafrechtswetenschappen, verbonden aan de Erasmus Law School van de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam.
Artikel

Het herstelrechtelijk ongeloof in het concept bestraffing

Een verkenning op basis van het ‘last resort’-principe

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 3 2010
Trefwoorden bestraffing, abolitionisme, last resort, criminele gedragingen, leedtoevoeging
Auteurs Vicky De Mesmaecker
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Discussions in the movement of restorative justice about the fundamental question, whether its interventions are alternatives to punishment or alternative punishments, have become repetitive and seem to be in a dead end. The author reviews the arguments against the background of the ‘last resort’ principle in Husak’s work. Husak distinguishes between last resort in terms of sentencing and last resort in terms of criminalization. Since the restorative justice movement does not fundamentally reject the primary criminalisations, but accepts the definitions of certain forms of conduct as crime, it merely strives to offer alternatives to punishments that would otherwise be imposed. If protagonists of restorative justice want to avoid this, they should consider an abolitionist option to strive for decriminalization.


Vicky De Mesmaecker
Vicky De Mesmaecker is werkzaam aan het Leuvens Instituut voor Criminologie, K.U.Leuven.
Artikel

Wettelijke bepalingen voor herstelgerichte afdoeningen

Niet te weinig, niet te veel

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 3 2010
Trefwoorden bemiddelingsdiensten, wetgeving, preventie, strafproces
Auteurs Martin Wright
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Legislation affects restorative justice in four ways: existing legislation may allow it, new laws may enable it, laws may limit it, or restorative justice may be the norm. Examples from different countries are given and specific questions about the relationship of restorative justice to the criminal justice system discussed. It is suggested that, broadly speaking, safeguards should be legislated and practice regulated by an independent body. It is concluded that restorative practices, have the potential to transform society’s response to harmful behaviour.


Martin Wright
Martin Wright is senior onderzoeker aan De Montfort Universiteit in Leicester, Engeland.
Casus

Lima Declaration on Restorative Juvenile Justice

Declaratie en actiepunten wereldcongres jeugdherstelrecht, Lima, 4-7 november 2009

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 2 2010
Auteurs Annemieke Wolthuis
Auteursinformatie

Annemieke Wolthuis
Annemieke Wolthuis is onderzoeker aan de Open Universiteit en schrijft een proefschrift over jeugdherstelrecht en kinderrechten. Zij is tevens verbonden aan het Verwey-Jonker Instituut, waar zij bijdraagt aan maatschappelijk onderzoek, en redacteur van dit tijdschrift.
Artikel

Reparatieve en herstelgerichte strafrechtspleging.

Een goed argument voor tweesporigheid in strafrechtelijk beleid?

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Aflevering 1 2010
Trefwoorden tweesporenbeleid, gevangenispopulaties, detentieregime, reparatief recht
Auteurs David J. Cornwell
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Just over thirty years ago now, on 12th January 1977 to be precise, Sir Anthony Bottoms presented his Inaugural Lecture as Professor of Criminology at the University of Sheffield, UK. The full text of this almost prophetic Lecture was subsequently published in the Howard Journal of Criminal Justice and reached a much wider audience. One of its central themes was the emerging tendency within British criminal justice policy to treat really serious offenders in a significantly different manner from their less serious counterparts with whom a more lenient approach might be justified. This tendency he described as penal bifurcation.There were two reasons why such an apparently logical approach might be found exceptionable: the first relates to the general principal of treating like cases similarly, and the second that the practice was proposed on the basis of the relative extent of social risk that might be claimed to differentiate serious from less serious offending. Bifurcation in both of these forms is evident in the use within some jurisdictions of extended and indeterminate sentences for public protection, and in many respects also within parole release considerations.The central proposition in relation to bifurcation within this article is, however, of a somewhat different nature. Restorative justice places considerable reliance upon offenders accepting responsibility for their offences, showing remorse for the harm done to victims in the form of genuine apology, and then making reparation either to the victim(s) directly, or to victims of crime more generally. These principles apply equally to serious and less serious offenders, though the extent of reparation should logically be greater as the crime increases in gravity.In an era of widely increasing penal populations it is apparent that these escalations result from increased severity of sentencing on the one hand, and from wider use of custody and lower thresholds for imposing it on the other. Both forms of resort to custody in sentencing are increasingly justified on the basis of public protection, and to act otherwise is perceived (and often promoted in the media) as being ‘soft on crime’. Politicians anxious to retain electoral credibility do not wish to be labelled as soft on crime, and actively seek to avoid such accusations by supporting increasingly punitive measures against offenders.One of the reasons why restorative justice has attracted only limited acceptance in the world of adult criminal justice is that it is perceived as a less punitive response to offending than the more traditional retributive punishment mode or its ‘justice model’ desert-based counterpart. In the span of this article I shall attempt to describe how, with a respectable measure of bifurcation, a model of reparative and restorative justice can be presented as a viable and optimistic alternative to the penal politics of retributive punishment and social protection. That it might bring with it the potential for reduced use of custody will be left to the reader to decide.


David J. Cornwell
David J. Cornwell is criminoloog en consulent, gespecialiseerd in gevangenisvraagstukken. Hij heeft meerdere recente boeken op zijn naam staan, waarvan de laatste The penal crisis and the Clapham Omnibus in 2009 verscheen. Het (vertaalde) artikel in dit tijdschrift maakt deel uit van het genoemde boek.
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