Zoekresultaat: 15 artikelen

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Jaar 2014 x
Artikel

Access_open The Experience of Legal Injustice

Tijdschrift Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Aflevering 3 2014
Trefwoorden legal injustice, legal subject, law and morality, Fuller, Arendt
Auteurs Wouter Veraart
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This paper shows that Fuller and Arendt converge on a different point than the point Rundle focuses on. What Fuller and Arendt seem to share in their legal thoughts is not so much an interest in the experience of law-as-such (the interaction between responsible agency and law as a complex institution), but rather an interest in the junction of law and injustice. By not sufficiently focusing on the experience of legal injustice, Rundle overlooks an important point of divergence between Arendt and Fuller. In particular, Arendt differs from Fuller in her conviction that ‘injustice in a legal form’ is an integral part of modern legal systems.


Wouter Veraart
Wouter Veraart is Professor of Legal Philosophy and Director of Research at the Free University Amsterdam; w.j.veraart@vu.nl.
Artikel

Access_open Political Jurisprudence or Institutional Normativism? Maintaining the Difference Between Arendt and Fuller

Tijdschrift Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Aflevering 3 2014
Trefwoorden Arendt, Fuller, Hobbes, political jurisprudence, political freedom, authority, legality
Auteurs Michael Wilkinson
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Can jurisprudence fruitfully pursue a synthesis of Arendt’s political theory and Fuller’s normative legal philosophy? Might their ideas of the juridical person and the legal subject be aligned as a result of a shared concern for the value of legality, specifically of an institutional complex which is structured through the stability and predictability of the rule of law? It is doubtful that Arendt's concern for the phenomena of plurality, political freedom and action can usefully be brought into line with Fuller's normativist focus on legality, subjectivity and the inner morality of law. This doubt is explored by juxtaposing Arendt's theory of action and her remarks on the revolution, foundation and augmentation of power and authority with Fuller's philosophy that, however critical of its positivist adversaries, remains ultimately tied to a Hobbesian tradition which views authority and power in abstract, hierarchical and individualist terms.


Michael Wilkinson
Michael Wilkinson is Associate Professor of Law at the London School of Economics; m.wilkinson@lse.ac.uk
Artikel

Access_open Legal Subjects and Juridical Persons: Developing Public Legal Theory through Fuller and Arendt

Tijdschrift Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Aflevering 3 2014
Trefwoorden Fuller, Arendt, legal subject, juridical person, public rule of law theory
Auteurs Kristen Rundle
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The ‘public’ character of the kind of rule of law theorizing with which Lon Fuller was engaged is signalled especially in his attention to the very notion of being a ’legal subject’ at all. This point is central to the aim of this paper to explore the animating commitments, of substance and method alike, of a particular direction of legal theorizing: one which commences its inquiry from an assessment of conditions of personhood within a public legal frame. Opening up this inquiry to resources beyond Fuller, the paper makes a novel move in its consideration of how the political theorist Hannah Arendt’s reflections on the ‘juridical person’ might aid a legal theoretical enterprise of this kind.


Kristen Rundle
Kristen Rundle is Senior Lecturer of Law at the University of New South Wales; k.rundle@unsw.edu.au
Article

Access_open Juveniles’ Right to Counsel during Police Interrogations: An Interdisciplinary Analysis of a Youth-Specific Approach, with a Particular Focus on the Netherlands

Tijdschrift Erasmus Law Review, Aflevering 4 2014
Trefwoorden legal representation, counsel, juvenile justice, police interrogations, children’s rights
Auteurs Prof. Dr. Ton Liefaard Ph.D. LL.M en Yannick van den Brink
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The right to counsel of juveniles at the stage of police interrogations has gained significant attention since the Salduz ruling of the European Court on Human Rights in 2008. The legislative and policy developments that have taken place since then and that are still ongoing – both on a regional (European) and domestic (Dutch) level – reveal a shared belief that juvenile suspects must be awarded special protection in this phase of the criminal justice proceedings. This calls for a youth-specific approach as fundamentally different from the common approach for adults. At the same time, there seems to be ambivalence concerning the justification and concrete implications of such a youth-specific approach. This article aims to clarify the underlying rationale and significance of a youth specific approach to the right to counsel at the stage of police interrogations on the basis of an interdisciplinary analysis of European Court on Human Rights case law, international children’s rights standards and relevant developmental psychological insights. In addition, this article aims to position this right of juveniles in conflict with the law in the particular context of the Dutch juvenile justice system and provide concrete recommendations to the Dutch legislator.


Prof. Dr. Ton Liefaard Ph.D. LL.M
Prof. Dr. T. Liefaard is Professor of Children’s Rights (UNICEF Chair) at Leiden Law School, Department of Child Law; t.liefaard@law.leidenuniv.nl.

Yannick van den Brink
Y.N. van den Brink, LL.M, MA, is PhD researcher at Leiden Law School, Department of Child Law; y.n.van.den.brink@law.leidenuniv.nl.
Article

Access_open Legal Assistance and Police Interrogation

(Problematic Aspects of) Dutch Criminal Procedure in Relation to European Union and the Council of Europe

Tijdschrift Erasmus Law Review, Aflevering 4 2014
Trefwoorden Legal assistance, police interrogation, Dutch Criminal Proceedings, EU Directive
Auteurs Paul Mevis en Joost Verbaan
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This paper discusses the rise of a fundamental issue in Dutch criminal proceedings. The presence of a lawyer prior to and during police interrogations has for a long time been a matter open for debate in the Netherlands. Allowing legal assistance during and prior to police interrogations has been researched on several occasions in the previous century and the beginning of this century. In the Netherlands, one of the most important reasons for not admitting legal assistance was and is founded in the confident reliance on the professionalism and integrity of police officers and justice officials in dealing with the interests of suspects. However, after the Salduz case (ECHR 27 November 2008, Appl. No. 36391/02, Salduz v. Turkey), the Dutch government was compelled to draft legal provisions in order to facilitate legal assistance during and prior to police interrogations. The initial drafts still contained a hesitant approach on admitting the lawyer to the actual interrogation. The EU-Directive of November 2013 (Pb EU 2013, L249) set out further reaching standards compelling the Dutch government to create new drafts. In a ruling of April 2014, the Dutch Supreme Court (ECLI:NL:2014:770) argued that the judgements of the ECtHR were too casuistic to derive an absolute right to have a lawyer present during police interrogation. However, they urged the legislator to draft legislation on this matter and warned that its judgement in this could be altered in future caused by legal developments. The Dutch legislator already proposed new draft legislation in February. In this paper it is examined whether the provisions of the new drafts meet the standards as set out in the EU-Directive as well as by the ECtHR.


Paul Mevis
Paul Mevis is Professor of Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure at the Faculty of Law of the Erasmus. He has been a visiting professor at the universities of Münster, Mmabato (South Africa) and in Moldavia, the Ukrain and in Frankfurt an der Oder. Besides his academic activities, Paul Mevis is Honorary Judge at the Criminal Court of Rotterdam and Honorary Judge at the Court of Appeal in Amsterdam, since 1994 and 1998 respectively. He has been parttime Judge at the Court of Arnhem (1990-1994) and is member of the Commission of Supervision of prisons (2006-2008). Paul Mevis is also member of the board of editors of several journals in the field of criminal law and human rights law and commentator for the journal ‘Nederlandse Jurisprudentie’ on criminal cases. He was chairman of the ‘Commissie Strafvordelijke gegevensvergaring in de informatiemaatschappij’ (2000-2001), of which the report has lead to the Bill of the same name. He is a member of the School of Human Rights Research and the Research School on Safety and Security in Society.

Joost Verbaan
Mr. J.H.J. (Joost) Verbaan is an assistant-professor at the Erasmus School of Law of the Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. He teaches Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure law. Mr. Verbaan is the Managing Director of the Erasmus Center for Police Studies (ECPS). The ECPS organises courses on criminal and criminal procedure law for law enforcement agencies as well as the prosecution. Mr. Verbaan has been involved in many researches in the practical field of investigation. He has taken part in the research for the Governmental Institute of Scientific Research and Documentation on the effects of the presence of an attorney during the first police interrogation.For the same institute together with professor Mevis he researched the Modalities of Serving in comparative law perspective.He served the secretary of the Committee to draft a new Dutch Antillean Criminal Code and served the secretary of the Committee to draft a new Criminal Code for Aruba, Sint Maarten and Curacao. He served the secretary of the Committee to Draft a common Criminal Procedure Code in the Caribbean regions of Aruba, Curacao , Sint Maarten and the BES-territories. In the republic of Surinam Mr. Verbaan has worked in the legal advisory board of the Committee founded in order to codify a new Criminal Code for the republic of Surinam.

    ADR in Kenya is traceable to the pre-colonial era. Before colonial rule, African communities applied traditional justice systems in the resolution of disputes. Some of these traditional justice systems are what are formally called ADR. It is through the imposition of formal justice systems by the British that certain ADR mechanisms were recognised in Kenya. In recent times, ADR is one of the commonly used avenues in accessing justice in Kenya. ADR in Kenya is growing at an unprecedented rate courtesy of its recognition in law, inaccessibility of courts and tribunals, backlog of cases and increased commercial activities requiring the use of ADR processes. Consequently, there are efforts by government and the private sector aimed at promoting ADR in Kenya. These efforts suggest that the future of ADR in Kenya is promising. In this article, the authors discuss the growth, development and practice of ADR in Kenya highlighting some of the likely challenges and opportunities in its use.


Francis Kariuki
Francis Kariuki is a Lecturer at Strathmore University Law School.

Linet Muthoni
Linet Muthoni is the Executive Officer of the Strathmore Dispute Resolution Centre.
Article

Access_open Faith and Scepticism in Private International Law: Trust, Governance, Politics, and Foreign Judgments

Tijdschrift Erasmus Law Review, Aflevering 3 2014
Trefwoorden private international law, conflict of laws, foreign judgments, European Union, United States
Auteurs Christopher Whytock M.S., Ph.D., J.D.
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    In both the European Union (EU) and the United States (US), the law governing the enforcement of foreign judgments is evolving, but in different directions. EU law, especially after the elimination of exequatur by the 2012 ’Recast’ of the Brussels I Regulation, increasingly facilitates enforcement in member states of judgments of other member states’ courts, reflecting growing faith in a multilateral private international law approach to foreign judgments. In US law, on the other hand, increasingly widespread adoption of state legislation based on the 2005 Uniform Foreign-Country Money Judgments Recognition Act (2005 Act), which adds new case-specific grounds for refusing enforcement, suggests growing scepticism. In this essay, I explore possible reasons for these diverging trends. I begin with the most obvious explanation: the Brussels framework governs the effect of internal EU member state judgments within the EU, whereas the 2005 Act governs the effect of external foreign country judgments within the US. One would expect more mutual trust – and thus more faith in foreign judgment enforcement – internally than externally. But I argue that this mutual trust explanation is only partially satisfactory. I therefore sketch out two other possible explanations. One is that the different trends in EU and US law are a result of an emphasis on ’governance values’ in EU law and an emphasis on ’rights values’ in US law. Another explanation – and perhaps the most fundamental one – is that these trends are ultimately traceable to politics.


Christopher Whytock M.S., Ph.D., J.D.
Christopher Whytock is Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine School of Law.
Artikel

National variations in the implementation and enforcement of European food hygiene regulations

Comparing the structure of food controls and regulations between Scotland and the Netherlands

Tijdschrift Recht der Werkelijkheid, Aflevering 3 2014
Trefwoorden food regulation, official controls, EU food law, implementation, enforcement
Auteurs Tetty Havinga
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Over the course of time the European Union has increased its powers considerably. Currently, almost all food safety regulations in the member states rest on European law. Despite this common legal base, several differences between member states still exist. This article compares the way Scottish and Dutch authorities deal with a particular item of European food law: the development of national guides to good practice for hygiene and for the application of HACCP principles by the food industry. The results of this investigation are consistent with the conclusion of Falkner et al. that the implementation of EU law in both the Netherlands and the UK depends on domestic issues. The dominant issue in Scotland (and the UK) is the FSA objective to bring consistent food controls and independency from industry which results in the development of governmental guidance. The prevailing issue in the Netherlands is making industry responsible for food safety which helps explain the extensive use of industry guides. This study shows that in order to understand what happens on the ground it is important to look beyond transposition or direct effect and also to investigate the implementation of regulations and to dig deeper than just their transposition.


Tetty Havinga
Tetty Havinga is Associate Professor at the Institute for the Sociology of Law, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. She has published on the regulation of food safety, policy implementation and law enforcement, equal opportunities law, asylum migration and migrant workers. Her recent research projects deal with the development and effects of private regulation of food safety, oversight and official controls in the food industry, and the experiences of large companies with Dutch special courts. She is co-editor of The Changing Landscape of Food Governance (to be published by Edward Elgar, 2015).
Artikel

The Use of Mediation in Tax Disputes – UK Position

Tijdschrift Nederlands-Vlaams tijdschrift voor mediation en conflictmanagement, Aflevering 3 2014
Trefwoorden mediation, Tax disputes, HMRC, international arena
Auteurs Peter Nias en Nigel Popplewell
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The article looks at the background to the use of mediation as a tool for resolving tax disputes between the UK tax authorities (HMRC) and UK taxpayers. It explains HMRC's litigation and settlement strategy which comprises the broad structure within which HMRC must operate to resolve such disputes. It then looks at specific guidance published by HMRC dealing with ADR and mediation in particular. The operational elements of this guidance, and the authors practical experience of them are then described, as are their views, with the limitations of the process. Finally the authors look at the application of ADR in the international arena.


Peter Nias
Peter Nias is a barrister and CEDR accredited mediator. He is a member of Pump Court Tax Chambers in their ADR Unit, a member of CEDR’s Tax Panel of mediators and has collaborated with CEDR to create the Tax Disputes Resolution Hub. Until 2012 he was a partner and solicitor in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery UK LLP, where he was head of the Tax Practice and its Tax Dispute Resolution Group. Since qualifying in 2010 as an CEDR Accredited Mediator, Peter has been focussing his time advising clients on mediation and premediation strategies for resolving tax disputes. He has been working with HMRC’s Dispute Resolution Unit in developing a collaborative dispute resolution (CDR) Programme for complementing their Litigation and Settlement Strategy.

Nigel Popplewell
Nigel Popplewell is a partner in law firm, Burges Salmon LLP. He is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Taxation, a CEDR Accredited Mediator, and deals with all aspects of UK tax, and disputes with UK tax authorities.
Artikel

Access_open Racial Profiling and the Presumption of Innocence

Tijdschrift Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Aflevering 1 2014
Trefwoorden racial profiling, stop-and-frisk, presumption of innocence, communicative theories of criminal law, social inequality and criminal law
Auteurs Peter DeAngelis
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    I argue that a compelling way to articulate what is wrong with racial profiling in policing is to view racial profiling as a violation of the presumption of innocence. I discuss the communicative nature of the presumption of innocence as an expression of social trust and a protection against the social condemnation of being undeservingly investigated, prosecuted, and convicted for committing a crime. I argue that, given its communicative dimension, failures to extend the presumption of innocence are an expression of disrespect. I take the New York Police Department’s stop-and-frisk policy as an example of racial profiling and argue that its use of race-based forms of suspicion as reasons for making stops is a violation of the presumption of innocence. I maintain that this systemic failure to extend the presumption of innocence to profiled groups reveals the essentially disrespectful nature of the NYPD policy.


Peter DeAngelis
Peter DeAngelis is Ph.D. Candidate in Philosophy at Villanova University.
Artikel

Autonomie, ambtelijke organisaties en criminaliteitsbestrijding

Over samenwerking tussen overheidsinstanties bij de aanpak van mensenhandel

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Criminologie, Aflevering 1 2014
Trefwoorden collaboration, public administration, law enforcement, human trafficking, multi-agency approach
Auteurs Dr. Barbra van Gestel en Drs. Maite Verhoeven
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    How do organisations collaborate in the daily practice of law enforcement? And what role plays autonomy of government agencies within this cooperation? In this article the authors answer these questions on the base of two case studies: two large scale projects in which a partnership approach was used to combat human trafficking in the Netherlands. Collaboration between city administration, investigation services and tax authorities seems to be very hard to put into practice. This is understandable from the theory that government agencies, while performing their tasks, are focused on achieving autonomy.


Dr. Barbra van Gestel
Dr. B. van Gestel is als onderzoeker werkzaam voor het WODC.

Drs. Maite Verhoeven
Drs. M.A. Verhoeven is als onderzoeker werkzaam voor het WODC.
Artikel

To resist = to create? Some thoughts on the concept of resistance in cultural criminology

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift over Cultuur & Criminaliteit, Aflevering 1 2014
Trefwoorden resistance, create, revolution, cultural criminology, transformation
Auteurs Dr. Keith Hayward en Dr. mr. Marc Schuilenburg
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This article provides a theoretical analysis of the label ‘resistance’. It sets out from the premise that the notion of resistance, although it has been current in criminology for some time, is still vaguely defined. We argue that resistance is not just a negative term, but can also be seen as a positive and creative force in society. As such, the primary function of resistance is to serve as a solvent of doxa, to continuously question obviousness and common sense. In the process of resistance we distinguish three processes: invention, imitation and transformation. The third stage warrants deeper investigation within cultural criminology.


Dr. Keith Hayward
Dr. Keith Hayward is hoogleraar criminologie aan de School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research, University of Kent (UK). E-mail: k.j.hayward@kent.ac.uk

Dr. mr. Marc Schuilenburg
Dr. mr. Marc Schuilenburg is als universitair docent verbonden aan de sectie Criminologie van de Vrije Universiteit te Amsterdam. E-mail: m.b.schuilenburg@vu.nl
Article (without peer review)

Access_open Nut en noodzaak van een algemene codificatie van bestuursrecht

Tijdschrift Netherlands Administrative Law Library, februari 2014
Auteurs Rolf Ortlep, Willemien den Ouden, Ymre dr. Schuurmans Ph.D. e.a.
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This article on the usefulness of a general codification of administrative law forms the closing contribution of a NALL-special. In this special, various authors have reflected on the successfulness of a broad codification process in 1998, which introduced rules on the notification of decisions, policy rules, subsidies, enforcement and supervision of administrative authorities in the Dutch General Administrative Law Act (GALA). The editors asked the contributors whether the objectives of the rules introduced were met and how the rules turned out to function in practice. In this overarching article, the NALL-editors reflect on the general lessons to be learned for the GALA-legislator. In these lessons they also take into consideration the initiatives for a law of administrative procedure of the European Union.


Rolf Ortlep
Rolf Ortlep (UU), Willemien den Ouden en Ymre Schuurmans (beide UL), Albertjan Tollenaar en Gerrit van der Veen (beiden RUG) en Johan Wolswinkel (VU) vormen de NALL redactie. Zij bedanken redactiesecretaris Alke Metselaar (UL), zonder wie deze bijdrage en special niet in de huidige vorm zou hebben kunnen verschijnen.

Willemien den Ouden
NALL redactie

Ymre dr. Schuurmans Ph.D.
NALL redactie

Albertjan Tollenaar
NALL redactie

Gerrit van der Veen
NALL redactie

Johan Wolswinkel
NALL redactie
Artikel

Dutch influence on the reform of the Macedonian system of civil enforcement

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Civiele Rechtspleging, Aflevering 1 2014
Trefwoorden bailiffs, civil enforcement, direct enforcement, dejudicialization
Auteurs Prof. dr. T. Zoroska-Kamilovska
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The Macedonian system of civil enforcement has long been construed as a reflection of the principle of “re-adjudication upon the original request for legal protection”. The worryingly low execution rate and the excessive length of the enforcement procedure have imposed the necessity of urgent “restructuring” of the entirety of the enforcement system, and the Dutch model has served as an excellent role-model. This article provides a short overview of the characteristic features of the Macedonian enforcement system, and the degree to which they correspond to the Dutch model of civil enforcement.


Prof. dr. T. Zoroska-Kamilovska
Prof. Dr T. Zoroska-Kamilovska is Associate Professor of Civil Procedural Law at the Faculty of Law ‘Iustinianus Primus’, Ss. Cyril and Methodius State University in Skopje, of the Republic of Macedonia.
Artikel

‘Staring at the felony forest’

De complexiteit van risicoprofilering nader in kaart gebracht

Tijdschrift PROCES, Aflevering 1 2014
Trefwoorden profileren, discretionaire bevoegdheden, etniciteit, selectie
Auteurs Tim Dekkers MSc en Mr. dr. Maartje van der Woude
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    In the Netherlands, the debate around police profiling has been rather low key – until recently. Now it has turned into a heated discussion with a clear focus on ethnic profiling. This extensive international literature review aims to show that there is more to profiling than just ethnicity. Factors such as behavior and the vehicle someone is driving can be just as important as a person’s looks. The results of this study put profiling in perspective and level the playing field of the debate, in which the side of the organizations using profiling has not gotten enough attention until now.


Tim Dekkers MSc
Tim Dekkers MSc is junior onderzoeker bij het Instituut voor Strafrecht & Criminologie van de Universiteit Leiden.

Mr. dr. Maartje van der Woude
Mr. dr. Maartje van der Woude ishoofddocent Straf- en strafprocesrecht aan het Instituut voor Strafrecht & Criminologie te Leiden. Zij is tevens redactielid van PROCES.
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