Zoekresultaat: 5 artikelen

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Jaar 2010 x
Artikel

Civil litigation in a globalizing world: a multidisciplinary perspective

Conference Report

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Civiele Rechtspleging, Aflevering 4 2010
Trefwoorden civil litigation, harmonization, civil procedure, cultural values, comparative law
Auteurs S. Vacarelu en A. Ognean
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Globalization has generated an increasing necessity of having to litigate in foreign courts and to enforce judgment in other countries. The diversity of procedural regimes represents an important obstacle for an efficient access to justice, which triggered a debate on the need for harmonization of civil procedure. These topics were explored in the conference organized by Dr. Xandra Kramer and Prof. dr. C.H. (Remco ) van Rhee on 17-18 June, 2010, under the auspices of Erasmus University Rotterdam. The instant conference report summarizes the arguments on the future of procedural harmonization in Europe, which seem to favor a horizontal approach to harmonization.


S. Vacarelu
S. Vacarelu is working on his dissertation.

A. Ognean
A. Ognean is working on his dissertation.
Discussie

Access_open Constitutionalism and the Incompleteness of Democracy

A Reply to Four Critics

Tijdschrift Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Aflevering 3 2010
Trefwoorden constitutionalism, globalization, democracy, modernity, postnational
Auteurs Neil Walker
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This reply to critics reinforces and further develops a number of conclusions of the original paper. First, it answers the charge that it is biased in its discussion of the relative standing of constitutionalism and democracy today, tending to take the authority of the former for granted and concentrating its critical attention unduly on the incompleteness of democracy, by arguing that contemporary constitutionalism is deeply dependent upon democracy. Secondly, it reiterates and extends the claim of the original paper that the idea and practice of democracy is unable to supply its own resources in the development of just forms of political organization. Thirdly, it defends its key understanding of the overall relationship between democracy and constitutionalism as a ‘double relationship’, involving both mutual support and mutual tension. A fourth and last point is concerned to demonstrate how the deeper philosophical concerns raised by the author about the shifting relationship between democracy and constitutionalism and the conceptual reframing they prompt are important not just as an explanatory and evaluative window on an evolving configuration of political relations but also as an expression of that evolution, and to indicate how this new conceptual frame might condition how we approach the question of a democracy-sensitive institutional architecture for the global age.


Neil Walker
Neil Walker is Regius Professor of Public Law and the Law of Nature and Nations at the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

    The author notes that the growth of restorative justice practices seems to be hampered by the consequences of the effective socialization into the ‘penal equation’ that presents punishment as the necessary consequence of criminal offending. Upbringing in a different conflict-culture may be a fundamental condition for creating more room for restorative justice in the formal sphere of criminal justice. The need for a different socialization is also noted and discussed in the movement for human rights and has resulted in an Action Plan for human rights education of UNESCO in 2005. A satisfactory implementation of this action plan seems to be absent in the Netherlands today and methods of human rights education do not refer at all to the potentials of restorative practices such as peer mediation in schools. On the other hand, authors in restorative justice do not often refer to human rights and how they are promoted. The author claims that it is plausible that making ample room for peer mediation and conferencing in schools can be an effective way, not only to address offending conduct that often implies a breach of basic human rights – the most basic values therein being human dignity and equality – but also to make new generations aware of the meaning of human rights in their daily interactions and the qualities of their own social life.


John Blad
John Blad is als hoofddocent Strafrechtswetenschappen verbonden aan de capaciteitsgroep Strafrecht en Criminologie van de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam en hoofdredacteur van dit tijdschrift.
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